Friday, 30 September 2016

The Brit Snitch

(image from here)

1. Introduction

One of the biggest, if not the biggest, mysteries of the Maddie case is related to something we in the blog don’t subscribe to at all: that Maddie’s death was related to paedophilia.

One of the reasons we don’t subscribe to that theory is exactly because of this mystery, as we hope to explain today.

The fact that we don’t subscribe to the paedophilia thesis doesn’t mean we haven’t paid it attention, because we have and a whole lot of it.

Friday, 23 September 2016

Follow the money

1. Introduction

It’s said that good things come in threes or, as the other side would now say, also do bad things.

But in the Maddie case the good things for us and bad for them have come in fours this summer break.

To be accurate, during the summer of 2016 there seemed to be only three good things, the fourth only arrived just last week with the approval of the funding of Operation Grange for the second semester of the 2016/2017 fiscal year. The first semester had been approved back in April.

Since we returned from holidays we have already addressed two of them in respective posts: the association of Clement Freud with the Maddie case and the firing of Clarence Mitchell.

Friday, 16 September 2016

Mitchell walking the plank

1. Introduction

As we showed last week in our “Freud and Maddie” post, finger pointing Clement Freud and welding solidly him to the Maddie case was a turning point in the case.

Katie Hopkins’ article in her column in the Express on February 22 this year was the materialisation of a tide that had definitely changed against those orchestrating the McCann campaign, as we said in our post “Tide Change”.

Its importance wasn’t so much about what Hopkins wrote but about the fact that an article against the McCanns had been published by the UK media. That’s where it made history. Only after almost 9 years was the British media allowed to question the McCanns’ saintly image. Rather late than never and never was what had been determined in 2007 to be.

Friday, 9 September 2016

Freud and Maddie

1. Introduction

The summer of 2016 was quite an eventful one, both inside and outside the Maddie case.

Outside it, Brexit was unquestionably what attracted the most attention.

As it happened in Britain and had as consequence a new government, one would expect that it would have significant implications in the Maddie case. Surprisingly, very surprisingly for us, it turned out that it had very few implications at all and the ones that it did were in favour of  the truth as we will explain.